Flight Simulators

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Flight Simulators Designed by Coronado Air Hangar Inspires Hanover & Beyond!

Posted by on 2:27 am in Flight Simulators, News | Comments Off on Flight Simulators Designed by Coronado Air Hangar Inspires Hanover & Beyond!

Flight Simulators Designed by Coronado Air Hangar Inspires Hanover & Beyond!

Alvaro Coronado, a resident and business owner in Ashland, Virginia is an empirical engineer. While the U.S. economy seems to be failing and manufacturing leaving our borders, Alvaro, innovative, inventive and determined, without engineering education and training, has U.S. history repeating itself in an attempt to restart the Industrial Revolution of our world’s super power, by building three flight simulators in his living room; two of which he sold to a 70 year-old Vietnam Marine Veteran helicopter pilot, providing him with a way to renew his skills, recall a chapter in his life, and reconnect with other military buddies, all right from his home, defying and challenging himself not to be confined despite his ailing health. Alvaro, a Colombian immigrant, and now US citizen, says he never forgets that he is on borrowed land and is grateful for what the USA has gifted him the most, OPPORTUNITY. A true believer in anything can “start with just one” he is working to renew America’s spirit of entrepreneurship. His third, and newest build out, is what is known as a glass cockpit. Having pushed the limits in software and hardware through the past few years of trial and error, it has tons of gadgets, gauges, screens, tablets, applications, and more. His new cockpit is also for sale, however, as often happens by accident and circumstance, flight simulation gaming has quickly presented itself to be a catalyst for an academic and vocational Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (S.T.E.M.) economic market niche; as it truly proven to be a “kid magnet”. Taking their lead from the kids who have talked us up after a fun visit, local school board administrators and members, vocational education program coordinators, school principals, and government officials, some of whom are pilots themselves, have reached out to virtually fly with us to see what the kid’s chatter and excitement is all about. Through his build out of gaming flight simulators in his living room, Alvaro has managed to create interactive entertainment for children who think they are just virtually having fun, while in reality, that fun experience is providing them with so many real-world experiences and teaching them about physics, weather, wind, climate, geography, topography, astronomy, space exploration, mathematics in computing fuel loads for distance, passenger and cargo loads, engineering, navigation, record-keeping, detailing, location of countries, states, cities, latitude, longitude, land and sea, monuments, mountain ranges, cultures, compass and map reading, altitude, reading of gauges like altimeters, speed, horizontal, vertical and global positioning systems, radio, tower and coding communications, airport locations and codes for real-life travel, familiarity with flying vs. fear of flying, history of military, aircrafts, wars, G-forces, historic people. It is hard to believe there is so much more to offer, but there truly is, and those things are in addition to perhaps careers as a pilot, mechanic, engineer, or astronaut. Above all what drives (oops perhaps flies) us here at the Coronado Air hangar, to building these incredible self-contained tiny classrooms, is our concern that the next generation needs development beyond dependence on GOOGLE for answers to their real-life and real-world situations. So, by Alvaro building his virtual fleet under Coronado Airlines is using 21st century technology to draw kids in as virtual pilots, co-pilots, mechanics and engineers, and kids unknowingly are learning old school lessons...

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Ashland man flies a Boeing 737 in his living room

Posted by on 6:10 am in Flight Simulators, News | Comments Off on Ashland man flies a Boeing 737 in his living room

Ashland man flies a Boeing 737 in his living room

BY CINDY HUANG Richmond Times-Dispatch Alvaro Coronado put on his headphones as sounds of flight attendants and passengers flooded the cockpit, his eyes looking straight ahead. He checked his various gauges and put his feet gingerly on the pedals. Then the plane lifted off the ground at 165 mph, without Coronado ever leaving his cozy home in Ashland. Coronado built the cockpit of a Boeing 737 in the middle of his living room. Four outdated Dell monitors display the changing view of the sky and earth. A keyboard allows him to use Microsoft software that simulates flight. Bent plumbing pipes hold the shape of the nose. Layers of thin metal sheets used for roofing are nailed to a plastic material around the piping. Hard spray foam used for insulation holds everything together. Coronado is a jewelry store owner by trade and a renaissance man by habit. He plays the flamenco guitar, creates replicas of museum artifacts, practices martial arts and, now, dabbles in aerospace engineering. “The whole thing started because I was afraid of flying,” said Coronado, his voice carrying a smooth Colombian accent. He said that if he’s afraid of something, it’s because he’s afraid of the unknown. And so he had to face it. “By learning all the sounds and movements the airplanes does, everything seemed so normal. The sound of the landing gears, the flaps,” Coronado said. As he flew his handmade Boeing 737 in his living room, his friend and pilot Col. Javier Garcia looked on. Garcia, who flew KC-130s in Iraq, explained how the steering wheel controls the altitude of the plane. “When you push (the steering wheel), the houses get bigger; when you pull, the houses get smaller,” Garcia said. He joked that the goal is to “keep the blue side up, brown side down.” Garcia said a real simulator costs millions of dollars. And Coronado’s simulator has the basic functions to keep a pilot in practice. “If I wanted to stay current, I would do this to keep my eyes where I want it to be,” said Garcia, referring to all the gauges and controls that pilots have to monitor and control. Coronado said he never went to flight school or engineering school. “I go to YouTube University,” he joked with a grin on his face. The process of building the plane involved trial and error and some unconventional thinking. Coronado’s wife and business partner, Caroline, said that when the project first began more than a year ago, her husband put the plumbing pipes in their tub so the hot water could help the pipes retain their shape. She joked that she doesn’t know how many wives would tolerate having plastic pipes in the tub and an airplane nose in the middle of the living room. But she’s proud of his fearless approach toward his projects. “He doesn’t think anything negative. He won’t open that crack to something not being possible. Then you’ve already defeated yourself psychologically,” Caroline said. She recalled him using chicken wire and papier-mâché when he first began constructing the plane. The next day, she said, it was all shriveled up because the paper contracted and bent the wires. “Alvaro had to go to Plan B,” Caroline said. “We’re probably on Plan double E now.” Coronado connects digitally with...

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Afraid of flying, this guy built his own cockpit

Posted by on 1:54 am in Flight Simulators, News | Comments Off on Afraid of flying, this guy built his own cockpit

Afraid of flying, this guy built his own cockpit

Instead of flight school, he chose ‘YouTube University’ By CINDY HUANG Richmond (Va.) Times-Dispatch ASHLAND, Va. – Alvaro Coronado put on his headphones as sounds of flight attendants and passengers flooded the cockpit, his eyes looking straight ahead. He checked his various gauges and put his feet gingerly on the pedals. Then the plane lifted off the ground at 165 mph, without Coronado ever leaving his cozy home in Ashland. Coronado built the cockpit of a Boeing 737 in the middle of his living room. Four outdated Dell monitors display the changing view of the sky and Earth. A keyboard allows him to use Microsoft software that simulates flight. Bent plumbing pipes hold the shape of the nose. Layers of thin metal sheets used for roofing are nailed to a plastic material around the piping. Hard spray foam used for insulation holds everything together Coronado is a jewelry store owner by trade and a renaissance man by habit. He plays the flamenco guitar, creates replicas of museum artifacts, practices martial arts and, now, dabbles in aerospace engineering. “The whole thing started because I was afraid of flying,” said Coronado, his voice carrying a smooth Colombian accent. He said that if he’s afraid of something, it’s because he’s afraid of the unknown. And so he had to face it. “By learning all the sounds and movements the airplanes does, everything seemed so normal. The sound of the landing gears, the flaps,” Coronado said. As he flew his handmade Boeing 737 in his living room, his friend and pilot Col. Javier Garcia looked on. Garcia, who flew KC-130s in Iraq, explained how the steering wheel controls the altitude of the plane “When you push (the steering wheel), the houses get bigger; when you pull, the houses get smaller,” Garcia said. He joked that the goal is to “keep the blue side up, brown side down.” Garcia said a real simulator costs millions of dollars. And Coronado’s simulator has the basic functions to keep a pilot in practice. “If I wanted to stay current, I would do this to keep my eyes where I want it to be,” said Garcia, referring to all the gauges and controls that pilots have to monitor and control. Coronado said he never went to flight school or engineering school. “I go to YouTube University,” he joked with a grin on his face. The process of building the plane involved trial and error and some unconventional thinking. Coronado’s wife and business partner, Caroline, said that when the project first began more than a year ago, her husband put the plumbing pipes in their tub, so the hot water could help the pipes retain their shape. She joked that she doesn’t know how many wives would tolerate having plastic pipes in the tub and an airplane nose in the middle of the living room. But she’s proud of his fearless approach toward his projects. “He doesn’t think anything negative. He won’t open that crack to something not being possible. Then you’ve already defeated yourself psychologically,” Caroline said. She recalled him using chicken wire and papier-mâché when he first began constructing the plane. The next day, she said, it was all shriveled up because the paper contracted and bent the wires. “Alvaro had to go to Plan B,” Caroline...

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